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Parchment Background Image for My Projects: Importing Items Into RCT3: CSO's I Have Imported: Arched Supports and Railings Set on FlightToAtlantis.net

This set began as a spin-off from my Decking, Stairs, and Balustrades Set. From humble beginnings as a supplementary set that I thought would total around twenty to thirty pieces, the set has evolved into a hugely versatile assemblage of more than 200 pieces. It is just about complete with only a few more railing pieces to add.




I’m considering some way of presenting this set without its taking up ten webpages so for now this topic won’t cover the entire set. However, there are two special additions I’ve made to Arched Supports and Railings that I think merit special mention at this time.




Pathway Arch




Tied for first place with my Armillary Sphere I believe this project to be the best model I’ve imported. It’s a pathway built on the top of a long-span arch.




This particular path is built entirely over pool complex and spans almost fifty terrain tiles in RCT3. I very much wanted a path suspended over pool complex but I did not want a couple of dozen individual supports interrupting the visual flow in my pool beneath this path.




I built this model in response to my needs.




My Projects - CSO's I Have Imported, Arched Supports and Railings Set - Aegean Sands Suspended Pool Path Arch, View From South to North, Image 01

My Projects - CSO's I Have Imported, Arched Supports and Railings Set - Aegean Sands Suspended Pool Path Arch, View From North to South, Image 02

So they wouldn’t appear to be later additions that have been stuck in place as an afterthought, three 2h stairs are designed into the span of this arch, in addition to one 0h path exit.




As seen in the top center of the first image, two of the 2h exits provide entrance and exit access up to the Volo daVinci track which has two stations in my park, the one seen here located in the small garden decorated with archways above pool complex.




The other 2h exit allows guest access down onto another arched walkway to Sandwich Terrace. That walkway can be seen at the center right of the second image above.




Supplementary Support




For want of a better name this piece is called a supplementary support column. It was created for multi-level path systems where the standard support could not be used because the support bottom would partially block the pathway below.




There are four of these in my park. I was very concerned that if I added this to my set it would detract from the set as a whole but for all the effort they took to make it was a relief to discover that they’re surprisingly difficult to see when I zoom around my park in it’s day-to-day. Here’s a view looking up into the sky alongside one.




My Projects - CSO's I Have Imported, Arched Supports and Railings Set - Supplementary Support, View Looking Skyward Alongside Upper Block, Image 03

As you see, the supplementary support piece is made up of a base, a column, and a path support bracket that is an extension of the steel core inside the column. A decorative urn comes on top. Here’s an aerial view of the same supplementary support alongside Upper Block.




My Projects - CSO's I Have Imported, Arched Supports and Railings Set - View From Upper Block Roof Taken of Same Supplementary Support Shown In Previous Image, Image 04

This is one of the others we've built across Windsurfer Bay, near Mega-Drop.




My Projects - CSO's I Have Imported, Arched Supports and Railings Set - Supplementary Support Bearing The Weight Of A Path Near Rip Tide, Image 05

The one in this second image has two brackets. The brackets place separately from the column so as to add versatility to the supplementary support. As you see I’ve designed the brackets so they look adequate to the task of providing heavy-duty support to the paths above. Below the decorative base, the steel core inside the column has a foundation that’s 250 feet deep.